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Excellence

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Most athletes in the motocross world have probably never heard of Joe Friel. For those of you who have not, I can tell you that he is a big BIG deal in the endurance world. He is one of the most well respected and studied coaches of all time. When Joe speaks, people listen. Much of the principles and methods presented on this site are based on Joe's books and articles. Coach Seiji (currently training Andrew Short, Jason Anderson, and Jimmy Albertson) is a life long student of Joe's work and is the first trainer in motocross to take what Joe does for the endurance athlete and apply it to motocross. The programs Coach Seiji has written for the premium training plans offered on Virtual Trainer are based on these same principles. The following article is a great example of how Joe's writings transend the endurance world and can be applied not only to the motocross athlete but life in general. - Virtual Trainer


This article is reprinted from www.joefrielsblog.com
By Joe Friel

Excellence is not for everyone. It’s far too difficult for the great majority of those who participate in sport. In fact, those who seek excellence are often ridiculed because they are different from their peers. And so it isn’t easy to seek excellence either. Humans are social animals; we don’t like being outcasts. It’s much easier to go along with the crowd than to stand out in a crowd. But there are athletes who pull it off, and with great aplomb. Have you ever noticed how young, pro athletes often try to give the impression that nothing about their training or dedication to the sport is unusual? They’ve learned to give the appearance of being “just like everyone else,” even though their performance in competition tells us otherwise. Going out of their way to be laid-back is how they cope with the dilemma and help prevent others from branding them as strange. And that’s a good strategy which I would recommend to anyone who truly seeks excellence: Try not to give the air of someone who is seeking excellence. Appear ordinary in every way you can.

What brought all of this up was a question someone asked me over dinner tonight. We were at a surprise party for an athlete I coach who had just won his age category at his state’s time trial championship. It was clear to my dinner-table neighbor that this state champ had altered his course in the past year and was becoming excellent at cycling. So my new friend wanted to know what I looked for in a person who wanted to hire me as a coach. How would I know if a person could be successful? I started to tell him all of what follows but we were interrupted by party goings-on. Here’s the long list of what I think are the best predictors of excellence in sport, in their order of importance, in case he gets a chance to read this post.

  • Motivation. This one is more important than all of the others combined. If the athlete isn’t motivated excellence is highly unlikely. In fact, the other predictors won’t even exist without motivation. This goes well beyond giving lip service to goals. The truly motivated athlete is on a mission and has a hard time keeping himself or herself in check. This person really needs a coach to pull on the reins to prevent overtraining, injury, illness and burnout. If the coach has to use a whip then it’s a losing cause no matter how talented the athlete is. The coach will never give the athlete motivation. It must come from within. When I’m interviewing athletes I ask lots of questions to find out how truly motivated they are. For example, I ask how often they train with other athletes versus alone. The low-motivation athlete will need companionship frequently. If you are motivated then all of the following predictors of excellence will fall into place eventually.
  • Discipline. This is very simple. The disciplined athlete will make daily sacrifices and make due with hardships in order to excel. This person doesn’t miss workouts short of a disaster. Weather is an insignificant factor. The disciplined athlete knows that the small stuff is important. He or she doesn’t get sloppy with diet, recovery, equipment or anything else that has to do with goals. Discipline is not easy. Others can accept motivation, but they have a hard time dealing with people who are disciplined. You’ve got to make light of or even hide your discipline if you want to be accepted by your peers. Good luck here.
  • Confidence. Some people seem to live life completely with an unwavering belief in themselves and their actions. These folks are indeed rare. I’ve met very few athletes who didn’t have some concerns about how well suited they were for whatever the task at hand may be. There’s a sliding scale of confidence. Most of us are somewhere in the middle. To move closer to the high-confidence end all we typically need is some success. Success breeds confidence. While it’s hard to come by you can create your own. For the athletes I’ve coached whose confidence was decidedly on the low end I’ve suggested a daily confidence-booster. When they go to bed and after the lights are out, I tell them to go back in their memories and find anything in their day’s workout or related activities that was successful at any level. This could be a very small success such as feeling strong going up a certain hill during the workout today, or eating fruit instead of a cookie for a snack. I tell them to then relive that small success over and over until they fall asleep. Occasionally there are big successes. These become “anchors” which they relive often and store away in a vault to be pulled out whenever they feel low confidence coming on, like at the starting line of a race. Thinking of one’s successes breeds success. Success breeds confidence.
  • Focus. This could also be called purpose; the athlete knows where he or she wants to go in the sport. Daily training is a purposeful activity that will lead to excellence. Each workout (and accompanying recovery) is a small building block that eventually results in excellence. But you have to take it one step at a time, which brings us to the last predictor, patience.
  • Patience. According to Malcolm Gladwell in his book The Outliers it takes about 10,000 hours for a person to become a master of anything. I had never tried to quantify it in terms of hours, but experience told me that performing at the highest level in sport takes something on the order of 10 years of serious training regardless of when you started in life. So I think Gladwell is probably right. There are certainly exceptions, or at least it appears that way on the surface. But when an athlete comes along who seems to go to the top right away we often find on closer examination that he or she had been developing outside of the recognized success pathways. Patience also has another level that goes beyond this long-term approach to success. This is a more immediate, daily component associated with the ability to pace appropriately early in workouts and races. Athletes who seem unable to learn this skill are less likely to be successful than those who master it.
Notice that I didn’t say anything about innate talent, physiology, skills, or even experience in the sport. All of these things can be developed and learned if the other predictors are there. I’ve never met anyone who didn’t have the capacity to develop each of these mental abilities. As mentioned earlier, the challenge for most of us in seeking excellence is learning how to do it without appearing to be doing so. Watch how most of the pros do it and try to emulate their apparently laissez-faire attitude. Good examples are Chrissie Wellington in triathlon and David Zabriskie in road cycling (think Ryan Villopotto in motocross). In their own unique ways they give the impression of being unconcerned about excellence. But no one achieves their levels of accomplishment without being highly motivated, disciplined, focused and patient.

About the Author: Joe Friel has trained endurance athletes since 1980. His clients are elite amateur and professional road cyclists, mountain bikers, triathletes, and duathletes. They come from all corners of the globe and include American and foreign national champions, world championship competitors, and an Olympian.

He is the author of ten books on training for endurance athletes including the popular and best-selling Training Bible book series. He holds a masters degree in exercise science, is a USA Triathlon and USA Cycling certified Elite-level coach, and is a founder and past Chairman of the USA Triathlon National Coaching Commission.

Joe conducts seminars around the world on training and racing for cyclists, multi-sport athletes, and coaches, and provides consulting services for corporations in the fitness industry. He has also been active in business as a founder of Training Peaks (www.trainingpeaks.com), a web-based software company, and TrainingBible Coaching (www.trainingbible.com).

Joe lives and trains in the McDowell Mountains in Scottsdale, Arizona, overlooking the Valley of the Sun.

That's it for now, until next time, good luck with your training and remember, if you have a question, log on to the Virtual Trainer Expert Forum and have your question answered by a panel of experts. In addition, be sure and check out the Racer X Virtual Trainer archive section. Your complete one-stop information zone for motocross fitness. VT Signature

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Discussion

  1. Gravatar
    Jillian February 21, 2014 at 9:36 am

    As a motocross/offroad racer and new to triathlons Joe has become on my main person to learn about what I need to do to get better!

    He is brilliant!

  2. Gravatar
    Jeff February 21, 2014 at 12:04 pm

    Very cool to see something by Friel on RacerX.

  3. Gravatar
    Alex Jaroshevich February 21, 2014 at 2:04 pm

    This is a must read for all who want to be great! now take action and make it happen!

  4. Gravatar
    Bill Stevenson February 22, 2014 at 6:49 am

    That was a really great statement. Joe is probably not a huge name in moto but one of the best in cycling.

    A small (-) for his mention of Zabriskie who is a convicted dope cheat. You can go on and on about "they all did it" but who knows if he would have achieved what he did without dope.

    Otherwise, however, an awesome piece.

  5. Gravatar
    Mark R Motorhead February 22, 2014 at 10:40 am

    That last characteristic reminds me of when I took up cross-country running to help my motocross training, which I can highly recommend. The moto mentality of "get the holeshot" can really hurt you in a 10K foot race. I would always just have to start out in first, and would fade terribly by the half way point. I never had success in 10K races until I could discipline myself not to "get the holeshot".

  6. Gravatar
    Shawn Rennick February 24, 2014 at 9:03 pm

    Joe's work is great. You also need to check out Stu McGill, Ph.D, to get brushed up on core! The synergy of endurance training and the foundation of core is ideal for moto.

  7. Gravatar
    Racer X Virtual Trainer February 25, 2014 at 2:04 pm

    Very familiar with Dr. McGill's work and you are right, I need to add more of his stuff.

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