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How Fit Are You? Take the Challenge

by Racer X Virtual Trainer

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How fit are you? Motocross athletes often think of themselves as being the most fit athletes in the world. On the professional level I might agree with that, but I wonder how the weekend warrior motocrosser stacks up against the weekend warrior basketball player, runner, cyclist or golfer. Is the general population of motocross in better shape than then rest of the weekend warrior wanna-be's in the world? We may never know but there are recognized fitness standards that are used to determine if a person is in shape or not. To get into any of the Armed Forces you have to be able to do a certain number of pushups and situps and run a mile in a given amount of time. There is a standard set by our government as part of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports which is aimed at keeping America fit. And there are physical standards to become a firefighter, police officer, and other physically demanding jobs.

Determining how fit you are for motocross is of course relative. You may consider yourself fit if you can complete your motos without throwing up your lunch. You may also consider yourself fit if you can make it back to work on Monday. And then some of us aren't satisfied until we can go 40 plus minutes at top speed and still be fresh for moto 2. To put a quantitative measure on your fitness level, I have chosen three standards with which you can measure yourself to see where you stand; The physical fitness test for the Navy SEALS and Army Rangers along with the Canadian Home Fitness Test which was specifically developed for a fitness survey of the Canadian people in the early 1980's (I couldn't find a similar test for the U.S. Population).

So put on some running shoes, shorts and t-shirt because this article is going take some effort on your part. Obviously the SEAL and Ranger fitness tests are more rigorous than the Home Fitness test, but all are included to not only see where you stack up against the militaries elite but the rest of the population as well. All tests use similar exercises and require about an hour to complete.

Navy SEALS Fitness Test (reference)
Swim 500 Yards (457 meters)
Maximum time allowed is 12 minutes, 30 seconds -- but to be competitive, you should swim the distance in at least 8 to 9 minutes, utilizing only the Combat Swimmer Stroke, sidestroke, or breast stroke. Recommended workout and training tips: Get technique training and learn to pace yourself. Try 5 to 10 sets of 100-yard swims, working on a pace that will get you below the competitive times. (Rest 10-minutes after swimming the 500 yard test before moving on to the next exercise.)

Push-ups
Minimum number is 42 in 2 minutes, but you should shoot for at least 100 for an average score. Do not pace yourself. Push as many push-ups out as fast as you can, but do not neglect proper form or the SEAL instructor will not count them. (Rest 2 minutes, then move on to the next exercise.)

Sit-ups
Minimum number is 52 in 2 minutes, but you should strive for at least 100 in 2 minutes for an average score. PACE yourself! Try doing 20 to 30 sit-ups in 30 seconds; that will put you within the 80-to-100-sit-ups range for 2 minutes. (Rest 2 minutes.)

Pull-ups
The minimum is eight pull-ups with no time limit, but you cannot touch the ground or let go of the bar. You should be able to do 15 to 20 to be competitive. Try a pyramid of pull-ups: work your way up from one pull-up the first set until you can no longer do any more sets, then return down the pyramid repeating in reverse order (1,2,3,4,5,6,5,4,3,2,1). (Rest 10 minutes before the last exercise of the test.)

1.5-mile run
The maximum time allowed for this one is 11 minutes, 30 seconds, but you should be able to cover the distance in 9 to 10 minutes to be competitive. Pace yourself: do not start off too fast on the first lap. Shoot for a 90-seconds quarter-mile run time around a standard high school track. Repeat this pace for six to 10 sets until you no longer have to rest in between quarter-miles.

Canadian Home Fitness Test (reference)
These tests are designed to quickly gauge a person's general fitness level and to act as a benchmark for future testing. After taking the test, work out for a few months. Then, take the test again and compare the results. As it is sometimes difficult to do the test exactly as described, you just have to make sure you are consistent and do the exercise the same way each time. Then use the results as a benchmark for future testing. The table of results are based on doing the tests a specific way, and may not be accurate if the tests are modified at all. Don't let this worry you, just try and improve your own score. The test is divided into four sections. Do each part with plenty of rest between to fully recover.

  1. Step Test to measure aerobic endurance
  2. Push ups to test upper body strength
  3. Sit ups to test abdominal or trunk strength
  4. Squats to measure lower body strength

Step Test
This test is designed to measure your cardiovascular endurance. Using a 12 inch high bench (or a similar sized stair in your house), step on and off for 3 minutes. Step up with one foot and then the other. Step down with one foot followed by the other foot. Try to maintain a steady four beat cycle. It's easy to maintain if you say "up, up, down, down". Go at a steady and consistent pace.

3-Minute Step Test (Men)

Age

18-25

26-35

36-45

46-55

56-65

65+

Very Poor <79
<81
<83
<87
<86
<88
Poor 79-89
81-89
83-96
87-97
86-97
88-96
Below Average 90-99
90-99
97-103
98-105
98-103
97-103
Average 100-105
100-107
104-112
106-116
104-112
104-113
Above Average 106-116
108-117
113-119
117-122
113-120
114-120
Good 117-128
118-128
120-130
123-132
121-129
121-130
Excellent >128
>128
>130
>132
>129
>130

3-Minute Step Test (Women)

Age

18-25

26-35

36-45

46-55

56-65

65+

Very Poor <85 <88 <90 <94 <95 <90
Poor 85-98 88-99 90-102 94-104 95-104 90-102
Below Average 99-108 100-111 103-110 105-115 105-112 103-115
Average 109-117 112-119 111-118 116-120 113-118 116-122
Above Average 118-126 120-126 119-128 121-129 119-128 123-128
Good 127-140 127-138 129-140 130-135 129-139 129-134
Excellent >140 >138 >140 >135 >139 >134
Source: Canadian Public Health Association Project

Push Up Test

How many can you do? Men should use the standard "military style" pushup position with only the hands and the toes touching the floor. Women have the additional option of using the "bent knee" position. To do this, kneel on the floor, hands on either side of the chest and keep your back straight. Do as many push ups as possible until exhaustion. Count the total number of pushups performed. Use the chart below to find out how you rate.

Push Up Test (Men)

Age

17-19

20-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60-65

Excellent >56 >47 >41 >34 >31 >30
Good

47-56

39-47

34-41

28-34

25-31

24-30

Above Average

35-46

30-39

25-33

21-28

18-24

17-23

Average

19-34

17-29

13-24

11-20

9-17

6-16

Below Average

11-18

10-16

8-12

6-10

5-8

3-5

Poor

4-10

4-9

2-7

1-5

1-4

1-2

Very Poor
<4
<4
<2
0
0
0

Push Up Test (Women)

Age

17-19

20-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60-65

Excellent >35 >36 >37 >31 >25 >23
Good 27-35 30-36 30-37 25-31 21-25 19-23
Above Average

21-27

23-29

22-30

18-24

15-20

13-18

Average

11-20

12-22

10-21

8-17

7-14

5-12

Below Average

6-10

7-11

5-9

4-7

3-6

2-4

Poor

2-5

2-6

1-4

1-3

1-2

1

Very Poor

0-1

0-1

0

0

0

0

Sit Ups
Abdominal muscle strength and endurance is important for core stability and back support. This sit up test measures the strength and endurance of the abdominals and hip-flexor muscles. How many sit-ups can you do in 1 minute? Count how many you can do in one minute and then check the chart below for your rating. Starting Position: Lie on a carpeted or cushioned floor with your knees bent at approximately right angles, with feet flat on the ground. Your hands should be resting on your thighs.

Technique: Squeeze your stomach, push your back flat and raise high enough for your hands to slide along your thighs to touch the tops of your knees. Don't pull with you neck or head and keep your lower back on the floor. Then return to the starting position.

1-Minute Sit Up Test (Men)

Age

18-25

26-35

36-45

46-55

56-65

65+

Excellent >49 >45 >41 >35 >31 >28
Good 44-49 40-45 35-41 29-35 25-31 22-28
Above Average 39-43 35-39 30-34 25-28 21-24 19-21
Average 35-38 31-34 27-29 22-24 17-20 15-18
Below Average 31-34 29-30 23-26 18-21 13-16 11-14
Poor 25-30 22-28 17-22 13-17 9-12 7-10
Very Poor <25 <22 <17 <9 <9 <7

1-Minute Sit Up Test (Women)

Age

18-25

26-35

36-45

46-55

56-65

65+

Excellent >43 >39 >33 >27 >24 >23
Good 37-43 33-39 27-33 22-27 18-24 17-23
Above Average 33-36 29-32 23-26 18-21 13-17 14-16
Average 29-32 25-28 19-22 14-17 10-12 11-13
Below Average 25-28 21-24 15-18 10-13 7-9 5-10
Poor 18-24 13-20 7-14 5-9 3-6 2-4
Very Poor <18 <20 <7 <5 <3 <2

Squat Test
How many squats can you do? Stand in front of a chair or bench with your feet at shoulder's width apart, facing away from it. Place your hands on your hips. Squat down and lightly touch the chair before standing back up. A good sized chair is one that makes your knees at right angles when you are sitting. Keep doing this until you're fatigued. Write down how many squats you can do. After you work out for awhile, take the test again to see how much your lower body strength has improved.

Squat Test (Men)

Age

18-25

26-35

36-45

46-55

56-65

65+

Excellent >49 >45 >41 >35 >31 >28
Good 44-49 40-45 35-41 29-35 25-31 22-28
Above average 39-43 35-39 30-34 25-38 21-24 19-21
Average 35-38 31-34 27-29 22-24 17-20 15-18
Below Average 31-34 29-30 23-26 18-21 13-16 11-14
Poor 25-30 22-28 17-22 13-17 9-12 7-10
Very Poor <25 <22 <17 <9 <9 <7

Squat Test (Women)

Age

18-25

26-35

36-45

46-55

56-65

65+

Excellent >43 >39 >33 >27 >24 >23
Good 37-43 33-39 27-33 22-27 18-24 17-23
Above average 33-36 29-32 23-26 18-21 13-17 14-16
Average 29-32 25-28 19-22 14-17 10-12 11-13
Below Average 25-28 21-24 15-18 10-13 7-9 5-10
Poor 18-24 13-20 7-14 5-9 3-6 2-4
Very Poor <18 <20 <7 <5 <3 <2

Maybe you want to be an Army Ranger. You'll have to pass this fitness test first!

Ranger PFT

Minimum Scores

Recommended Scores

Pushups in 2:00

49 in 2:00

80+

Situps in 2:00

59

80+

Pullups

6

12+

2 Mile run

15:12

Sub 13:00

5 Mile run

40:00

35:00

16 mile hike w/65lb pack

5 hours 20 minutes

4-5 hours

15m swim with gear

P/F

P/F

Wonder how I and a few of my friends did on the test? Here are our results.

Name
Pushups
(2 min)
Situps
(1 min)
Situps
(2 min)
Pull ups
Step Ups
(3 min)
Squats
(no time limit)
1.5 mile run
Tim
(Virtual Trainer)
50 38 57 10 181 300 12:46
Angela Akdins 40 (on toes!) 24 34 0 133 230 15:23
Marie Advins 35 (on toes!) 29 41 0 124 120 20:44
John Casteel
(38 years old)
35 36 45 6 172 259 11:26
Erik Jordan
(21 years old)
62 52 68 12 210 500 10:20
Davey Heuy
(55 years old)
52 40 59 6 177 350 13:00

The Participants:
Tim - 41 years old, 6 feet tall, 195 lbs, rides for fun, exercises 5 days per week.
>>> Results - Not bad but truthfully, I expected more from myself. I qualified for the SEALS (except for the run) but there is no way in hell I could be one of those guys! As for the Canadians; I think I have them covered!

Angela - 18 years old, 5' 11" tall and I am old enough and wise enough not to give out a girls weight! Angela is my client and has aspirations of turning pro in Women's ATV racing. She trains and rides 6 days per week and has been training seriously for 7 months.
>>> Results - Angela has a larger frame than the average girl, so the situps posed a slight problem for her. However, her overall size will pay off huge this year on the bike. Overall she did very well but luckily for her our training is about to change over to a very intense portion of cardio which should have her right where we want her at the start of the season. She is going to be strong and fast!

Marie - 22 years old, 5'3" and again the weight will remain my secret. Marie is Angela's older sister who was in a life threatening car accident a few months ago. She exercises for health 3 days per week.
>>> Results - Marie did extremely well considering how badly she was injured. She is strong for her size and once she get's back into fighting shape, the feathers are going to fly! Her strength is her tenacity.

Take the test and post your results below in the comment section to show the rest of the world how you stack up. You never know which one of your fellow competitors may be watching!

That's it for now, until next time, good luck with your training and remember, if you have a question, log on to the Virtual Trainer Expert Forum and have your question answered by a panel of experts. In addition, be sure and check out the Racer X Virtual Trainer archive section. Your complete one-stop information zone for motocross fitness. VT Signature

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Discussion

  1. Gravatar
    Joel Hershfield October 17, 2012 at 12:43 pm

    I'm looking at the numbers for the step up test. It appears the numbers are higher for someone over 65? It shows that someone in that category has to do 88 to be considered poor where a man who is under 35 has to do only 81. The whole section just doesnt seem logical? The women's numbers seem a bit more logical but not that much. Help?

  2. Gravatar
    Racer X Virtual Trainer October 17, 2012 at 6:30 pm

    hmmmm, it's been a while since I posted this article and it would appear that I messed the numbers up a bit. I'll check the references and update.

  3. Gravatar
    Joel Hershfield October 19, 2012 at 1:12 pm

    Thanks TIm.

  4. Gravatar
    elle wilson May 05, 2013 at 7:18 pm

    um, hey so im 11 and i wanted to know what my numbers should be

  5. Gravatar
    Racer X Virtual Trainer May 06, 2013 at 8:37 am

    Elle - sorry I do not have numbers for your age. I have an 11 year old daughter who I know is in pretty good shape so if you do the test, post your numbers and you can compare to her.

  6. Gravatar
    Damien Coonan May 30, 2013 at 9:27 am

    300, 350 and 500 squats?? Really??

    I have a few questions
    Why?! Was there a bet involved? :)
    Continuous? Rest periods? Total time?
    How sore where you three over the next week? :)

    Love your work!
    DC

  7. Gravatar
    Racer X Virtual Trainer May 31, 2013 at 9:25 am

    DC - they were air squats so there was no soreness what so ever associated with the exercise. It is just a way to measure fitness. It's not like I use it as part of my regular training program. No time limit but the test is complete when more than a few seconds is needed between squats of the squat slows significantly.

  8. Gravatar
    steve coffman April 19, 2016 at 6:12 am

    I am 68 yrs old ... was wondering how my "score" might look ... I can do 75 pushups in about 70 seconds ... 25 squats using 224 lbs ... 100 sit ups and I never seem to get tired.

  9. Gravatar
    Racer X Virtual Trainer April 19, 2016 at 9:54 am

    Steve....ummmm, I'd say your "score" is pretty damn good. Any other 68 year-olds car to compare stats! Great job!

  10. Gravatar
    Taylor August 03, 2016 at 3:44 am

    Hey! I'm 15 and I wanted to know what my numbers should be too. I only play tennis (casually) so I wanna know if I'm in good shape. Can you help me with that?

  11. Gravatar
    Racer X Virtual Trainer August 09, 2016 at 8:27 pm

    Taylor,
    Do the test and post your numbers!

  12. Gravatar
    Taylor August 10, 2016 at 10:16 pm

    95 steps, 34 push-ups, 37 sit-ups, 32 squats, 6 pulls ups.

  13. Gravatar
    Racer X Virtual Trainer August 11, 2016 at 1:38 pm

    Not bad Taylor. You fall in the average category for most exercises. The charts only go down to age 18 so my guess for your age you are well above average. Good job!

  14. Gravatar
    Taylor August 11, 2016 at 7:23 pm

    Do you know any 15-year-old I can compare myself with? Maybe even 14/ 16 year-old's?

  15. Gravatar
    Racer X Virtual Trainer August 15, 2016 at 3:26 pm

    No, sorry. Just the people listed. Maybe get your friends to do the challenge or guys at the track!

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